Oh, For the Love of Plants

All gardeners get hit by it, if not often, then at least once or twice a year.   

A plant catches your eye, maybe in a book, in a show, in a nursery or in someone else's garden. 

Sometimes it is love at first sight and sometimes it is something that slowly develops. 

How it happens doesn't matter.  The fact is that it does and once we get hit, we want a plant and go after it. 

With that said, I welcome you to Berry-Go-Round #63.

 

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We start of with the Caryopteris , a common hybrid from eastern Asia.

The post features this beautiful blue-flowered plant, pollinators and a reversal of fortunes of sorts.  Donna, loves this plant and uses it a lot.  As a garden designer, she rarely has problems acquiring plants that she wants, but now finds herself having difficulties sourcing for this beauty.  She postulates on the possible reasons of the recent shortage and how it can be overcome.  

Caryopteris and Skipper from Garden Walk, Garden Talk

Caryopteris and Skipper from Garden Walk, Garden Talk

Creeping Buttercup from Notes of Nature

Creeping Buttercup from Notes of Nature

It's difficult enough to find regular plants, but what happens when you want mutated ones?  This post is part two of a series features the  Creeping Buttercup.

Tim , who loves learning about the natural world, saw a TV special on the genetic mutations of the buttercup and has been wanting to have his own mutated specimen.  

Read the post to see how he came by his plant.

Sometimes, you fall in love with a plant and just want to go out and get one (or several) immediately, distance notwithstanding.  

This is what I did once when I wanted some tillandsias (air plants) that were not available in my home city, or on my island for that matter.  

Tillandsia hybrids.

Tillandsia hybrids.

Parkinsonia aculeata at the Ruth Bancroft Garden from Bamboo, Succulents and More

Parkinsonia aculeata at the Ruth Bancroft Garden from Bamboo, Succulents and More

Or, sometimes it takes you weeks and weeks to choose a plant to buy, eventually deciding on a favorite of yours only to discover that it is not readily available in your locale.  How far do you go to get it? 

Gerhard really goes after the Palo Verde that he wanted for his frontyard.

At other times you fall in love with a plant but instead of pursuing actively you just keep an eye out for it.

Like in this post about about the Sea Squill which are difficult to find in Sacramento Valley.  You'll never guess where Gerhard eventually found his bulbs.

  

Drimia maritima from Bamboo, Succulents and More

Drimia maritima from Bamboo, Succulents and More

Leuchtenbergia principis from Plants are the Strangest People.

Leuchtenbergia principis from Plants are the Strangest People.

How many of you see a plant, think it is interesting, eventually leave it behind only to find out later on that it is something you want to have?  Something you NEED to have!  Then you find yourself going to back to where you saw it so that you can take it home with you.  

This happened to Mr. Subjunctive when he first set eyes on the "Weirdo-Loner" Leuchtenbergia principis.  Lucky for him it was still where he had left it.

How many of you are fortunate enough to have Mother Nature and her fauna step in and lend a hand?  Diana wanted some Bietou or Tick Berry in her garden and got it with hardly any effort.  

Why do I get the feeling that she exerted more effort going through her photos looking for a picture with berries?  :D

Chrysanthemoides monilifera from Elephant's Eye on False Bay

Chrysanthemoides monilifera from Elephant's Eye on False Bay

Grevillea x gaudichaudii from Danger Garden

Grevillea x gaudichaudii from Danger Garden

Not to be forgotten is the "tease".  You know, that plant that you want, that you see from time to time but can't seem to have?  Isn't that the worst feeling?  

Loree shares her experience chasing down the elusive Grevillea x gaudichaudii.  I noticed that her post about the acquisition was made 19 months after she first fell in love with the leaves and colors.  Can you imagine?  A year and a half of being teased and taunted . . . *shudder*

I end this post with a plant chase more extreme than any of those featured today.  Going after lodgepole pine needles.  It includes being chased by angry bees, the use of slingshots and driving around in a truck looking for plots established 40 years ago.

This is going after plants not just to garden or to collect but rather for the noble purpose of understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation to a climate.  Kim Gilbert visited 16 sites in BC and in the Yukon Territory in a span of three weeks to gather specimens for her research.  She went after 2,585 tree samples!!! How is that for dedication to plant research?

Pinus contorta from The Modern Forest

Pinus contorta from The Modern Forest

How about you?  What plant did you want and how did you get it?  


I hope you found good reading material in the post.  Do leave a comment if you can at each stop.  I'm sure it will be much appreciated.

Berry-Go-Round is a blog carnival of all things botanical.  If you want to volunteer as a host or submit an entry, click on the link.